Category: Books

Tip Tuesday: Printing Multiples of the Same Image Per Page in Lightroom’s Print Module

There are a couple of different ways, but we’ll start with probably the most-used method, which is choosing how many rows/columns of images you want on your page. In the Page Grid section of the Layout panel (in the right side Panels area), if you choose 1 for Rows and 1 for Columns, you get one image (makes sense, right?). If you want more than one image per page, you just increase either the number of rows or columns. For example, if you drag the Rows slider to 3, you will now have a page with three images stacked...

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Tip Tuesday: How to Save a RAW Photo Taken with Lightroom Mobile’s Camera App to Your Camera Roll

By default, RAW photos taken with Lightroom Mobile’s built-in camera app go directly into Lightroom — not into your cell phone’s Camera Roll, but if you want to save one of those original RAW images to your Camera Roll (apparently, a lot of folks want to do this), here’s how: Tap on the image you want to save to your Camera Roll, then tap on the “Share” icon up top. A pop-down menu will appear and you’ll want to tap on ‘Export Original’ and the RAW image will be saved to your camera roll. Easy as that.   This...

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Tip Tuesday: Make Lightroom Images Look Right on the Web

In the File Settings section of the Export dialog (Command-Shift-E [PC: Ctrl-Shift-E]), you get to choose your file type (JPEG, TIFF, and so on), but it’s making the right Color Space choice that determines if the colors of your image look pretty much like you see here in Lightroom, or whether they’ll be pretty much messed up. I’ll make it simple: choose sRGB for posting images to the web. They’ll look the closest by far to what you’re seeing onscreen in Lightroom. This tip originally published in How Do I Do That In Lightroom Classic? 2nd Edition by Scott...

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Tip Tuesday: Advanced Sharpening

Go under the Filter menu, under Sharpen, and choose Smart Sharpen. As the name implies, this is a smarter way to sharpen your image (with new math that’s much more advanced than the Unsharp Mask filter, which believe it or not, was in Photoshop version 1.0). The Smart Sharpen filter lets you apply more sharpening with less of the “bad stuff” associated with sharpening (like increased noise, halos that appear around the edges of objects, or little specks or artifacts in the sharpened image). Here’s how Adobe recommends you use this filter: First, make sure the Remove pop-up menu...

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